CARLYLE, THOMAS

Bid now! E-Mail a Friend Currency Converter

This autograph will be auctioned live on May 23, 2018. For more information and to place your bid click the "BID NOW!" button above.
CARLYLE, THOMAS - Carlyle Writes His Friend, the Commissioner in Lunacy
Click to close [X]

CARLYLE, THOMAS - Carlyle Writes His Friend, the Commissioner in Lunacy

Click image to enlarge

CARLYLE, THOMAS. (1795-1881). Influential British essayist, historian, and philosopher. ALS. (“T. Carlyle”). 2pp. 16mo. N.p., n.d. To his friend, prominent English writer and Commissioner in Lunacy BRYAN PROCTER (1787-1874; whose pseudonym was Barry Cornwall).  

 

“My wife has gone out, but I have opened the Note. There was a ‘debate’ here too; and it was admitted you were one of [the] kindest of men and a very Autolycusfor tricks! We will come to you after the dinner is done; about the stroke of nine thirty precisely, — and get all the good, eschewing the evil. The fact is, I am fitter for the hospital at the present than for any other place; woe’s me! Yours ever truly…” 

 

After short-lived careers as a teacher and a clergyman, the Scottish-born Carlyle found his calling as a writer. In 1826, he married Jane Baillie Welsh (1801-1866) and the pair lived on her estate Craigenputtock in Dumfriesshire until their 1835 move to London. His work includes his influential novel Sartor Resartus; the three-volume The French Revolution: A History; On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History; and his multi-volume biography of King Frederick the Great.These works earned him great renown and influenced contemporaries like Ralph Waldo Emerson, Charles Dickens and John Ruskin.

 

“In the history of English literature, few figures have risen to such commanding heights and fallen to such neglect in the space of a century as the Victorian social critic, historian, essayist, and ‘prophet’ Thomas Carlyle… In his own period he exerted a profound influence on a vast range of major figures, including politicians, theologians, scientists, economists, feminists, aesthetes, artists, novelists, poets, dramatists, historians, architects, and radicals and revolutionaries of every stamp… His signal contribution to Victorian culture was his deep realization of the moral and spiritual cost of industrialization, which had mechanized every area of life and transformed individuals into passive units of production and consumption. No other writer in the 19th century, not even Karl Marx, understood the personal and the political repercussions of this change with such luminous insight as Carlyle,” (“Thomas Carlyle,” Oxford Bibliographies, Sorensen and Kinsler).

 

In addition to his many essays and works of fiction and non-fiction, Carlyle, known for his cantankerous nature, was an enthusiastic correspondent, penning thousands of letters (now published) to his wife that record in great detail the unhappiness of their union. Of their marriage, marked by frequent quarrels, Samuel Butler wrote, “It was very good of God to let Carlyle and Mrs Carlyle marry one another, and so make only two people miserable and not four,”(quoted in Letters Between Samuel Butler and E.M.A. Savage 1871–1885, ed. Cape). Mrs. Carlyle is also notable in the annals of English literature for having inspired Leigh Hunt’s popular poem, “Jenny Kiss’d Me.” Our letter seems to refer to one of their quarrels or “debates.”

 

Educated at Harrow where his classmates included Lord Byron and Robert Peel, Procter initially practiced law before becoming a Commissioner in Lunacy, an office he held from 1831 to 1861, and about which Carlyle seems to be making a joke (“I am fitter for the hospital at the present than for any other place; Woe’s me!”). However, writing was Procter’s real vocation, and his works include A Sicilian Story, a tragedy Mirandola, The Flood of Thessaly, English Songs, Effigies poetica, and Charles Lamb; a Memoir. Despite some critics considering his work as derivative, his friends and admirers included Robert Browning, Charles Lamb and Alexander Pushkin, who sent a volume of his poems to a fellow author just hours before his fatal duel, and he was the dedicatee of both Thackeray’s Vanity Fair and Wilkie Collins’ The Woman in White. In Greek mythology Autolycus was Odysseus’ grandfather granted the skill of trickery by his father Hermes.

 

Folded and in very good condition.

 

 

Item #13074


This autograph will be auctioned live on May 23, 2018. For more information and to place your bid click the "BID NOW!" button above.
Bid now! E-Mail a Friend Currency Converter

Lion Heart Autographs, Inc. unconditionally guarantees to the original purchaser the authenticity of every autograph it sells without time limit.

We accept all major credit cards as well as PayPal, wire transfers and U.S. checks and money orders. Free domestic shipping via FedEx with credit card payment. For more information, click here.

Just this once...
Share your name and email address to receive:

Name
E-Mail
Tell us about your collecting interests, including specific names:

No, thanks

We respect your privacy. Your email address will never be shared with a third party.